EurekAlert! - Cancer

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Deep learning predicts woman's risk for breast cancer

(Radiological Society of North America) Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have developed a deep learning model that identifies imaging biomarkers on screening mammograms to predict a patient's risk for developing breast cancer with greater accuracy than traditional risk assessment tools. Results of the study are being presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

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https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-11/rson-dlp112320.php

COVID-19: Fall in cancer drug treatment rose quickly following 'rapid' NHS guidance

(University College London) The number of patients starting anticancer therapies dropped by more than 30 per cent in April, the month following the UK's first COVID-19 lockdown, but went above pre-pandemic levels within three months, finds a new study of NHS England data co-led by UCL researchers.

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https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-11/ucl-cfi112720.php

Scientists describe the role of a p53 target gene in lymphoma and lung cancer development

(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) An international team of scientists has studied whether Zmat3 could have critical functions that p53, the most important gene in preventing cancer, uses to prevent cancer. Their findings have shifted the focus of how Zmat3 could function in tumor development.

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https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-11/upf--sdt112720.php

T-ray technology reveals what's getting under your skin

(University of Warwick) A new method for analysing the structure of skin using a type of radiation known as T-rays could help improve the diagnosis and treatment of skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis and skin cancer.

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https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-11/uow-ttr112620.php

Big data powers design of 'smart' cell therapies for cancer

(University of California - San Francisco) Finding medicines that can kill cancer cells while leaving normal tissue unscathed is a Holy Grail of oncology research. In two new papers, scientists at UC San Francisco and Princeton University present complementary strategies to crack this problem with 'smart' cell therapies -- living medicines that remain inert unless triggered by combinations of proteins that only ever appear together in cancer cells.

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https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-11/uoc--bdp112320.php

Surrey's new hybrid X-ray detector goes toe-to-toe with state-of-the-art rivals

(University of Surrey) A new hybrid X-ray detector developed by the University of Surrey outperforms commercial devices - and could lead to more accurate cancer therapy.

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https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-11/uos-snh112620.php

Engineered "stealth bomber" virus could be new weapon against metastatic cancer

(Emory Health Sciences) Researchers at Emory and Case Western Reserve have re-engineered an oncolytic adenovirus. The resulting virus is not easily caught by parts of the innate immune system, making systemic delivery possible without arousing a massive inflammatory reaction.

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https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-11/ehs-eb112020.php

Multiple sclerosis may not put you at risk for breast, colorectal cancers

(American Academy of Neurology) People with multiple sclerosis (MS) may not be at higher risk of developing two of the three cancers that occur most commonly in people with MS, breast and colorectal cancer, than people who don't have the disease, according to a new study published in the November 25, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. However, the study did find that people with MS had a higher incidence of bladder cancer.

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https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-11/aaon-msm111920.php

A new website for the essence of COINS

(Innovation Center of NanoMedicine) Open a new website summarized COINS's vision on one page in easy-to-understand manner.

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https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-11/icon-anw112520.php

Survival protein may prevent collateral damage during cancer therapy

(Walter and Eliza Hall Institute) Australian researchers have identified a protein that could protect the kidneys from 'bystander' damage caused by cancer therapies. The 'cell survival protein', called BCL-XL, was required in laboratory models to keep kidney cells alive and functioning during exposure to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Kidney damage is a common side effect of these widely used cancer therapies, and the discovery has shed light on how this damage occurs at the molecular level.

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https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-11/waeh-spm112420.php

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